Polish Hunting Club of Canada

The Association of Polish Engineers in Canada cooperates with young people, and these young people willingly accept such cooperation. A member of the Polish Hunting Club and also a member of the aforementioned Association, Michał Kiełb, found out about it, visiting scouts from the "Wigry" banner, camped in the forest abyss near BARRY'S BAY. I took the matter seriously and took 15 kg of lures with me. And I haven't used any of them.

Since, by their own choice, the scouts from the "Wigry" Team decided to spend many weeks in the forest thicket, as a result, the surrounding flora aroused in their minds an adequate curiosity towards the forest space. With time, they had more questions, and questions to which the scouts themselves found it difficult to give a convincing answer. Hence the initiative of generational cooperation.

Before this happened, through discussions at the meetings of the aforementioned Association from Mississauga, chaired by Sławomir Basiukiewicz and Henryk Gadomski from the Canadian Polish Congress and at the same time an activist of the Polish Scouting Association, the need to organize a meeting with scouts on nature issues was established. In this way, I was selected to undertake this very noble mission. Of course, I accepted the offer without hesitation and with satisfaction.

But behind him, I found myself with the scouts in BARRY'S BAY, I had to prepare myself for this meeting. My point here was to use the time and space for further similar meetings, even in the following years. With that in mind, I came to this meeting for a period of three days to install special lures at a specific location for large predators roaming the area. In the future, in addition to these lures, such meetings with scout youth would be supported by the practical determination of species of wild animals living in the vicinity of the area selected for research in the field of hunting ecology.

The material of theoretical knowledge with authentic confirmation of forest events would become a Polish voice with an academic dimension somewhere in the Canadian natural environment. And such a transfer of knowledge would certainly not hurt scouts either. I think that it would even be an appropriate signpost for their further lives. Because, as we have known for centuries, knowledge from books comes from the practical transmission of older generations. And this meeting proved that there is no generational contradiction here. Such a state pleases not only my heart, but also the hearts of the community close to this environment.

Under certain conditions, which I found with the scouts on July 8, 2009, I had to use what was available to me within the range of the existing camp. And the best way to do it was to go deep into the forest so far that the representatives of the forest flora were within our reach. And so we started our conversation by explaining the circumstances, convincing these listeners that the forest is truly a "home" for wild animals.

36 Then we made it clear to ourselves that advancing civilization is constantly interfering with this "forest home" of wild animals. It has already been proven on many examples that this "forest house" is often thoughtlessly degraded, which undoubtedly has a great impact on the qualities of flora and fauna. I explained to the audience that it was man who caused wild animals to re-divide themselves into those that live in full wildness - misanthropes, or in partially lost wildness - i.e. synanthropic, or largely lost wildness - i.e. demystified. With this explanation, we realized that this kind of artificial division is constantly growing, which is the reason for human interference in the animal world.

Then we made it clear to ourselves that the advancing civilization is constantly interfering with this "forest home" of wild animals. It has already been proven on many examples that this "forest house" is often thoughtlessly degraded, which undoubtedly has a great impact on the values ​​of flora and fauna. I explained to the audience that it was man who caused wild animals to re-divide themselves into those that live in full wildness - misanthropes, or in partially lost wildness - i.e. synanthropic, or largely lost wildness - i.e. demystified. With this explanation, we realized that this kind of artificial division is constantly growing, which is the reason for human interference in the animal world.

The answer to the latter is to occupy downtown areas, which is why they can be seen on a daily basis in water reservoirs and urban green areas. We are witnessing the existence of such wild animals even with a high density of human population.

This group includes mainly wild Canadian geese - also known colloquially as barnacles, coyotes, turtledoves (mourning dove) - small pigeons, raccoons - (raccoons), foxes (red fox), popular skunks and various waterfowl. These animals have descended with their wildness, as if to the lowest shelf, and are often referred to as "domesticated" in the face of the lost wildness.

Explaining this issue, I explained to the gathered scouts that the last type of wild animals, after losing a large part of their wildness, resulted from many reasons, and above all, for predators that left their sight, which cannot "quickly turn" into similar natural creatures like their macaws. Other reasons that contributed to such a metamorphosis of transforming his way of life are, in large part, the acceptance of such a state by people living in urban settlements. Man in them, as a living "creature", through his behavior, favors the existence of degraded animals in their wildness, providing them with food, stress-free stay in a disproportionately small area in relation to the real area in their full wildness, and enabling them to even breed in such conditions.

We also talked about the mating periods of forest animals, but already those living in full wildness, when the reproduction of future generations is determined by the strength of males, in the case of polygamy, or the constant care for the young in monogamy, or the prevention of the reproductive phenomenon through polyandry.

When my audience fell silent and the lips of my listeners parted, I explained to them what nesters and nesters were. It would be hard not to mention the "territoriality" of wild animals and how it changes with the loss of wildness. When the forest insects made us feel more and more, we ended this forest session with my story about the herd life of many animals, and above all about wolves. We finished our part of the forest meeting with a story about bears and their life, which is largely filled with long winter sleep. And the bear's dream is a natural phenomenon in itself? After all, it is not difficult to understand, especially for young people, that excluding such a large predator from the "forest canteen" for the winter months is an amazing chance for the survival of predators smaller than it. For this reason, it will be much easier to overwinter its potential farms. Moreover, any bear in winter, with its black or brown color, plus its huge carcass, would be too visible an object on all sides. With its high weight (100 to 500 kg), in the snowy season, walking alone would be too strenuous for a bear, as it would sink deep into the snow, losing too much of its life energy. In short, at such a time the bear's hunting success would be negligible.

Hence, nature compensated for this difficult winter period with prolonged sleep, thus giving them the opportunity to survive without detriment to their health, and a "simulated break" with the resources of nature from the bear's circle of interest.

Here, a moment of breath after the first forest session, because we left the forest and moved to the roof, where the scouts were eating their meals. We spent the second part of our nature session asking me questions.